I Changed to a Heart-Healthy Diet to Keep My Heart Ticking
 
Include these food items for a long and healthy life

I Changed to a Heart-Healthy Diet to Keep My Heart Ticking

By Gagandeep Kaur

A strong perception in India is that men are more prone to heart ailments than women. Unfortunately, the last few years have witnessed an increase in the number of women suffering from heart disease. What jolted me was a 36-year old acquaintance undergoing an emergency angioplasty. This incident singlehandedly made me shift to a heart healthy diet by including food for the heart in my meals.

Mind you, it wasn’t an easy feat. It takes all the willpower you’ve got and, of course, a loving supportive family goes a long way. In my case, this made all the difference. And yes, I had a few tricks up my sleeve when I was in the kitchen, which ensured that the meals remained healthy yet visually appealing. In the task of taking better care of my heart, being conscious of what I ate was the starting point, and the sooner I began, the better off I'd be. Here are a few ways in which I changed my diet for a healthy heart and hopefully, a longer life:

Reduce salt and spices

Indian diet is rich in salts and spices, so this was extremely tough to practice. Initially, when I brought down the salt intake in my regular meals, I craved the mango pickle or crispy papad. Then, I realized there was no other way but to be mentally strong because small indulgences now could have bigger consequences later.

I made small alterations to recipes like substituting salt with oregano in a tomato sandwich or even adding rock salt instead of table salt to lemonade. WHO recommends that daily intake of salt should not be more than 5 gms. So, remember this when you feel the urge to add salt and chat masala in fruit chat. I discovered that having fruit chat with roasted cumin powder, lemon juice and black salt tastes way better. These two, rock salt or black salt, are slightly better options, as they’re said to have lower sodium content than regular table salt but I’d encourage being very, very sparing with the use of these, too.

Go fibery

A fiber-rich diet is recommended for a healthy heart. It helps lower cholesterol and reduces the risk of cardiovascular problems. While kidney beans and chickpeas are rich in fiber, the Indian way of cooking them actually reduces their nutritional value. So, now I go for a chickpea salad with cucumber, tomatoes and spring onions diced together and seasoned with lemon juice and mint leaves. This way I avoid the oil and extra salt yet enjoy the salad. Its a win-win for a heart healthy diet.

Grill, grill and grill some more

Grilling is not part of everyday Indian cooking but my enthusiasm to reduce oil intake made me try this and do I love it! I strongly recommend grilling chicken and fish. My all-time favorite recipe entails marinating the chicken in a mix of olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, paprika and a little salt for about 15-20 minutes and then, grilling it in the oven. You can also experiment with rosemary and thyme. There is no need to add any additional oil, and it is flavorsome food for the heart.

As I incorporated these changes in my meals, I started feeling lighter, fitter and more agile. These small fixes helped me adopt an overall healthier lifestyle. I'm sure this will make a difference to you in the long run too. Opting for a healthier alternative in my day-to-day life helped me improve my immunity and lose weight. And thinking back, it was much easier to change my habits at this stage of my life than after some sort of heart health crisis. I'm glad I made the switch, and you can too.

 

Disclaimer: This publication / editorial / article does not constitute or imply an endorsement, sponsorship or recommendation of any Products. Please consult your doctor/ healthcare practitioner before starting any diet, medication or exercise.